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Now


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Now


Once the center of life on the Harold Stadsvold farm, the barn had become a nuisance and an eyesore. It was in severe disrepair and no one has been allowed into the barn for years. This was largely due to the memory of Treva and Bill Turpin's son, Tim, who had fallen through the hay hatch in the floor of the hay loft. He had landed on his head far below, on the concrete floor. Fortunately, there had been a waft of hay on that patch of earth on which he had landed. In time he would have a full recovery but this was not something that Treva had ever wanted to revisit.

Unknowing what God was to do with this barn, Bill had been praying for the day that the wind, that so frequently visits this hill, would finish the work it had been doing over the decades.

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Early Years


Early Years


Standing tall and proud against the rural Iowan skyline, this barn was built in the 1950's by Harold Stadsvold and his father. Jens Stadsvold. Desiring to be consistent with his Danish roots, Harold opted for a traditional Nordic roof-line and purchased such plans for this style of barn from Iowa State University. He and Jen had set up jigs in the farmyard in which they would stack strips of water soaked fir, nail them in place and allow them to dry. Holding the future shape of the barn, these rafters would support the roof and all the power that nature would throw at the barn.

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2002


2002


The western elevation was very intact. This was largely due to the foundation that was buried into the earth. The block walls were able to support the footings and walls to give it strong support.

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2002


2002


However, the western elevation was not so protected. The walls were weakened by the weight of the barn, kicking the knee walls out and causing the roof to drop. This downward pressure caused the long roof braces to bow and detach, furthering the roofs decent. Eventually the east wall was losing its structural integrity and allowing the continued droop of the roof-line.

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rafters and braces


rafters and braces


Much of the loss of structural integrity was exacerbated by the decision by Harold Stadsvold to deviate from the plans from I.S.U. and substitute 4x2 laminated rafters in place of the plans requirement of 4x4 rafters. This would not show up for decades but it would show up and need repair.

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Cornerstones


Cornerstones


Matthew 7: 27 When the rains and floods come and the winds beat against that house, it will collapse with a mighty crash.”

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clean-up


clean-up


What goes up, must come down. Unfortunately, too much has come down.

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Jacks


Jacks


Lifting the east-facing barn floor is necessary to frame the wall that rests on it.

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Support


Support


We all like support, so does 10,000 pounds of barnwood.

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Bearing


Bearing


The blocks will be removed and the wall will stand on the new posts. This will shorten the basement by approximately one foot. Hmmm, what will happen to the upper barn?

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Barn Door


Barn Door


Fortunately the west wall does not need rebuilding, the barn door must go, however.

Here's proof it has.

Here's proof it has.

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Braces


Braces


This is the full photo, due to the vertical nature of the photograph, it doesn't show well as a banner photo. The top shows the cleats used to affix the posts to the roof. The post is set at an angle and is pounded straight with a sledgehammer to raise the height of the roof.

After this, 2x6 planks are attached to either sides to the support braces, giving them the rigidity to hold the roof in place.

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Off with the old...


Off with the old...


Once the roof was lifted, the framing could be built, set one foot inside from the dilapidated,  existing wall. Once that was complete, a chainsaw was used to cutoff the old wall, leaving the new one!

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Framed Wall


Framed Wall


Don't be confused, these posers are not the work crew.

Don't be confused, these posers are not the work crew.

Mike Crippen's daughter is not acrophobic.

Mike Crippen's daughter is not acrophobic.

The real work crew beginning the process of sheeting the wall.

The real work crew beginning the process of sheeting the wall.

Harold Wade Stadsvold giving a tour of the barn his hands built.

Harold Wade Stadsvold giving a tour of the barn his hands built.

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...In with the new


...In with the new


 
The Inspector

The Inspector

 
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Finishing Steel


Finishing Steel


Wow! What a job! To think Bill thought this barn was about to blow over! Think again!

Job very well done.

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The People


The People


Guys and gals with a vision. They helped us realize the barn was a tool that God could use to reach Iowa and beyond. Thank you Hard Hats for Christ!

Guys and gals with a vision. They helped us realize the barn was a tool that God could use to reach Iowa and beyond. Thank you Hard Hats for Christ!

Spencer Roland and ???. Thank you Spencer!

Spencer Roland and ???. Thank you Spencer!

Mike Crippen, a master of the hammer and guitar. He spent many hours at Bethany Farm on the barn and other projects.

Mike Crippen, a master of the hammer and guitar. He spent many hours at Bethany Farm on the barn and other projects.

thank you so much and thank you lord!

Deck


Deck